Feb 6, 2019 | Featured in: Watching Backyard Birds, February 2019

The Hopeful Season

Crocuses bloom in a spring flower bed. Photo by photos.com.
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Is it too early to wish you a happy spring? I've been a spring anticipator my whole life. It's not that I dislike winter, but, if winter were optional, I'd probably ask for a no-thank-you helping—just enough to taste it. But spring! Oh, give me kite-flying winds and light-blue skies and soggy new, green grass, and daffodils all year long. Plus there's the anticipation of our returning bird friends. Yes, spring is the hopeful season, the season of renewal. Our gardens and lawns emerge from their long winter's nap, our trees begin swelling in their budding extremities, and our first bird songs are dancing across the warming daytime air.

Of course, there are the reminders of the season just past: the piles of seed hulls, the bird-dropping-covered deck railings and feeder poles. The nest boxes that need to be cleaned out and repaired. And let's not forget the smelly gunk that has collected in the bottom of the tube feeder. What better chance is there to deal with these backyard tasks than a sunny day in early spring?

I've been eagerly anticipating spring as a bird watcher for more than 45 years now. And spring's arrival gets a little sweeter every year.

Happy spring!

Bill Thompson, III
WBB Team Captain



About Bill Thompson, III

Bill Thompson, III, was the team captain for Watching Backyard Birds from its inception 23 years ago through his death on March 25, 2019. So much of what he wrote is timeless and remains informative, helpful, and inspiring.

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    by louisabt, Sun, 08 Mar 2020
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    by [email protected], Sun, 02 Feb 2020
  • Just wondering, should we put anything in the bottom of the box...twigs, clippings, leaves....anything at all?
    by Hebb, Tue, 28 Jan 2020
  • New to birding...newbie question. We spotted what we thought was a Sapsucker at our patio feeders in December. The folks at our birding supply store told us that Sapsuckers are only here in Summer months and what we saw was a Flicker. I thought I new what a Flicker was and this did not look like a Flicker. It was thinner and more smooth looking but did have the Woodpecker Bill.
    by Edmund Steinman, Wed, 08 Jan 2020
  • We just signed up and get your magazine via email. Will we be receiving a printed copy?Ed [email protected]
    by Edmund Steinman, Wed, 08 Jan 2020