Jun 26, 2019 | Featured Web Article

How Do Birds Eat?

A blue jay with a mouthful! You might observe them hauling off more peanuts than they could possibly eat, making several trips from your feeder to their cache site.
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Obtaining nourishment isn't a simple grab-and-go process among birdlife. In fact, feeding can be downright challenging for many species. To be able to eat, birds have to first search for food and then process what they find in order to make it digestible, tasks that are complicated for even your everyday backyard visitors.

Titmice and Chickadees

If you have titmice and chickadees in your backyard, you've no doubt noticed how they'll snatch up a seed and quickly flee the scene. This practice allows them to eat in peace, without having to confront more aggressive birds at the feeder. Because of their diminutive size, a small morsel of food fulfills a much higher percentage of their caloric needs compared to the same bite for a larger bird. Therefore, although this behavior involves a lot of movement, the strategy is actually energy cost-effective.

Crows and Jays

Rather than eating at the feeders they frequent, these corvids will carry their food long distances away, to cache their snacks for later consumption. You might observe them hauling off more peanuts than they could possibly eat, making several trips from your feeder to their cache site. Jays and crows perform this behavior at wild food sources as well, such as acorn-laden oak trees.

Owls

Owls, particularly those of the smaller species, need to immobilize their prey after they catch it so that their meal won't fight back or escape. Their solution is to decapitate their catch before they swallow it whole or carry it off to their cache.

Accipiters

Hawks will often pluck their prey directly off the ground, turning their own bodies around in multiple directions as they do so. What they leave behind when they finally fly off with their kill is a circle of inedible feathers or fur, about three feet in diameter.

Thrashers (and Thrashing Birds)

The thrashers of the desert southwest incorporate stinging scorpions and centipedes in their diet. To defend themselves, the birds have to effectively thrash their prey to kill the bugs quickly and crush their exoskeletons for improved digestion. Other thrashing birds include thrushes, which cannot commence feasting on the snails they catch until the gastropods' shells are removed. Many species of songbird have to remove the rigid, tough-to-swallow, and sometimes poisonous bristles of the fuzzy caterpillars they find before they can dine. Additional birds that thrash their prey before swallowing it whole include shrikes, kingfishers, and roadrunners.



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    by Edmund Steinman, Wed, 08 Jan 2020
  • We just signed up and get your magazine via email. Will we be receiving a printed copy?Ed [email protected]
    by Edmund Steinman, Wed, 08 Jan 2020
  • Chickadees are adorable and intelligent. Chickadees have brains that are the most like human brains. Chickadees are personable, lively, and have their own language. Chickadees form lasting pair bonds; and are very good parents. Love.
    by Merl Elton, Tue, 24 Dec 2019
  • I'm still worried about my backyard birds even though myth #3 says they won't starve if I stop feeding in the middle of winter. I'm concerned because I'm moving in a couple of weeks to a new house and the winter's in northern Ohio get pretty challenging. Should I start backing off slowly on there food or just stop when we move?
    by Vince Bove, Sat, 14 Dec 2019
  • Birds make our world a wonderful and beautiful place to live.
    by Mac Eco, Mon, 09 Dec 2019