Mar 18, 2020 | Featured in: Watching Backyard Birds, February 2019

Ask Birdsquatch: Wood Duck Boxes

Great placement for a wood duck box is in a pond, but ideally, the pole should be baffled to protect the box from climbing and crawling predators.
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Dear Birdsquatch:

I want to put up some wood duck boxes in my large, wooded backyard. However the nearest body of water (a wooded pond in a county park) is more than a half-mile away from my property. Am I being foolish? Do I need to ask permission to put the boxes on the park property where the pond is?

—Dawn, Who is Desirous of Ducks
Lawton, Oklahoma

Dear Desirous Dawn,

Wood ducks go searching for nesting cavities before the onset of the early spring nesting season. As long as your boxes are mounted facing south, high up in a tree, with a clear flight path to the opening, the woodies will likely find them. So I say put the boxes up on your property! Or better yet, put them up both places!

If you get permission to put them up in the park, you’ll want to place them out in the pond on baffled poles driven into the bottom of the pond. This requires some extra effort in either wading out or boating out to a likely spot to place the poles and mount the boxes.

You can buy pre-made wood duck boxes or build your own. Here are some basic plans for a DIY duck box. Now if you need help getting those poles driven into the mud, I know a guy who works for blueberry pie...



About Birdsquatch

Birdsquatch is WBB's tall, hairy, and slightly stinky columnist. He is a bigfoot who has watched birds all his life. His home range is unknown.

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