Nov 7, 2013 | Featured Web Article

Tell Us Your Backyard Story!

Blue jays enjoy breakfast at a reader's backyard feeder.
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Do you have a backyard bird story to share? Would you like to see your name in print in a magazine with international circulation?

People love to talk and hear about bird encounters, even simple, little stories that happen close to home. Watching Backyard Birds is seeking short (400-words, tops) stories from backyard bird watchers. You don't need to be an ornithologist or a professional writer—we're not offering to pay you, but we will offer a one-year subscription or renewal to WBB in exchange for stories we publish.

The only caveat is that your story must be true, and it must come to us via email. Professional editors will make sure your story shines, so don't worry about sending us something that isn't exactly Pulitzer material. We're looking for sweet or exciting bird stories from regular folks.

Lots of people have bird stories worth sharing, and we'd like to hear yours!

Send us your backyard bird story today »




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  • New to birding...newbie question. We spotted what we thought was a Sapsucker at our patio feeders in December. The folks at our birding supply store told us that Sapsuckers are only here in Summer months and what we saw was a Flicker. I thought I new what a Flicker was and this did not look like a Flicker. It was thinner and more smooth looking but did have the Woodpecker Bill.
    by Edmund Steinman, Wed, 08 Jan 2020
  • We just signed up and get your magazine via email. Will we be receiving a printed copy?Ed [email protected]
    by Edmund Steinman, Wed, 08 Jan 2020
  • Chickadees are adorable and intelligent. Chickadees have brains that are the most like human brains. Chickadees are personable, lively, and have their own language. Chickadees form lasting pair bonds; and are very good parents. Love.
    by Merl Elton, Tue, 24 Dec 2019
  • I'm still worried about my backyard birds even though myth #3 says they won't starve if I stop feeding in the middle of winter. I'm concerned because I'm moving in a couple of weeks to a new house and the winter's in northern Ohio get pretty challenging. Should I start backing off slowly on there food or just stop when we move?
    by Vince Bove, Sat, 14 Dec 2019
  • Birds make our world a wonderful and beautiful place to live.
    by Mac Eco, Mon, 09 Dec 2019