Nov 7, 2013 | Featured Web Article

Tell Us Your Backyard Story!

Blue jays enjoy breakfast at a reader's backyard feeder.
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Do you have a backyard bird story to share? Would you like to see your name in print in a magazine with international circulation?

People love to talk and hear about bird encounters, even simple, little stories that happen close to home. Watching Backyard Birds is seeking short (400-words, tops) stories from backyard bird watchers. You don't need to be an ornithologist or a professional writer—we're not offering to pay you, but we will offer a one-year subscription or renewal to WBB in exchange for stories we publish.

The only caveat is that your story must be true, and it must come to us via email. Professional editors will make sure your story shines, so don't worry about sending us something that isn't exactly Pulitzer material. We're looking for sweet or exciting bird stories from regular folks.

Lots of people have bird stories worth sharing, and we'd like to hear yours!

Send us your backyard bird story today »




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  • I live in Southeastern Massachusetts. Four "orphaned" very young poults (males) showed up in my yard about a year ago. They have been around all year. I do feed them cracked corn, and they come when I call for them. I don't want to over- domesticate them, but they do recognize me as the lady that brings food. They roost in the big oak trees at night. I have a 1 acre lot, with many acres of protected forest out back and a pond on the property.Lately, during mating season, I have had hens in the yard too. We've counted as many as 7 Toms and hens, but today, had just the one stalwart (a very robust Tom) that comes everyday. One of the Toms that has recently made an appearance is wounded, limping with an obvious predator wound. The local wildlife experts say he should make a full recovery, and that he's best left to recover with his flock.I find them to be interesting and beautiful birds.
    by Heather Cole, Mon, 06 Apr 2020
  • You have to put food in it.
    by Truckee Man, Mon, 06 Apr 2020
  • Love listeningto both songs and calls from birds in our woody neighborhood. The two types of birds I immediately recognize are the cardinals and the chickadees. Yesterday afternoon too, I heard a woodpecker. Then it’s time to check the birdfeeders and the birdbath. Then In no time at all the cardinals and chickadees arrive, as if they had been watching me. As it gets busier around the feeders, I also hear thé screeching of the blue jays. I even saw a couple of robins checking out our lawn....spring has arrived as the last pat gesofisticeerde snow and ice melt away.
    by louisabt, Sun, 08 Mar 2020
  • I am wondering about existing nests for Phoebes. I have two outdoor aisle entries to my barn and there are old Phoebe nests up. They ignore them each year and build new nests adjacent to the old, but space is running out. Should I knock down the old nests so they can rebuild?
    by [email protected], Sun, 02 Feb 2020
  • Just wondering, should we put anything in the bottom of the box...twigs, clippings, leaves....anything at all?
    by Hebb, Tue, 28 Jan 2020