Oct 11, 2017 | Featured in: Watching Backyard Birds, October 2017

Fall Birding Tips

Birdbaths—especially ones with moving water—are a great way to attract migrating birds.
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Moving water in your birdbath created by a mister or dripper is a fantastic way to attract birds. During spring and fall migration, when species not normally found in your area are passing through, an attractive birdbath can make them stop to bathe or drink. Make sure the basin is clean and in a spot where you can easily observe it throughout the day.

Let your lawn go. It's all about seed heads. Skip the final mowing or two of an area of your yard, and let the grass go to seed. This, too, is natural bird food. Passing buntings, sparrows, and finches will thank you by spending time in your slightly wild yard. Unmowed lawn sections can attract pine siskins, juncos, goldfinches, and several varieties of sparrows.

Leave your leaves. Leaving your fallen leaves alone helps your birds both directly and indirectly. The leaves trap and hold moisture from dew and rain, which helps keep your lawn from drying out. As the leaves break down (mowing over them can hasten this) they add valuable nutrients to the soil. Fallen leaves also attract and are fed upon by insects, which in turn are fed upon by birds such as robins, blackbirds, thrushes, bluebirds, catbirds, thrashers, and more.

Make your windows safe for migrants. Migrating birds get restless and almost hyperactive in the fall. Such activity can have tragic results if one or more of your windows is in a location where flying birds strike the glass. You can use a screen or strips of foil or plastic to break up reflections in the offending windows. The Bird Watcher's Digest Nature Shop sells a FeatherGuard for $9.99 (postage included) that deters birds. Whatever solution you choose, now is a good time to address the reflection of windows birds have hit.



About Bill Thompson, III

Bill Thompson III is the editor of Bird Watcher's Digest by day. He's also a keen birder, the author of many books, a dad, a field trip leader, an ecotourism consultant, a guitar player, and blogger.

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  • This is a good point. While cleaning mine, I kinda got the impression the cheep cheeps were waiting on me since they started chirping as soon as I brought it outside again. I swear they are so smart. Within five minutes of filling the feeder up, they are there to feast.cheers Cheep cheeps!
    by Kimber timbers, Fri, 20 Jul 2018
  • Hahaha, I love the ending remark "that area will have already been well -fertilized!"I've noticed that there are more cheep cheeps right after I clean the bird feeder compared to how many there are right before it was cleaned...so cheep cheeps do like and appreciate a well maintained feeder and they are worth the effort. : )
    by Kimber timbers, Fri, 20 Jul 2018
  • The storm saying seems true so far. We had as party at our bird feeder right before our last storm... 6 at once but different cheeps cheeps would come and go so there were more than 6 for sure..and squirrels eating with the birds
    by Kimber timbers, Fri, 13 Jul 2018
  • I know and do clean my feeders both for seed and for hummingbird liquid. I have a vase full of different size brushes that are only for this purpose. I have friends however who NEVER clean their feeders or bird baths, and it’s gross! I am ringing this article and will have to give out to the few offenders I know. I can’t imagine looking at such mess and not cleaning it, but not everyone thinks resale. Part of responsible bird watching/loving is to make the time and take the effort to do this.
    by Carol, Tue, 10 Jul 2018
  • Can juniper titmice be found in eastern US? In Sourh Carolina? I swear we saw one!
    by Marnie Lynn Browder, Sun, 10 Jun 2018