Jul 11, 2018 | Featured in: Watching Backyard Birds, August 2018

Your Garden: Let It Be

A garden with a combination of Echinacea (coneflower) and butterfly weed. Photo by U.S. Botanic Gardens / Wikimedia.
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I love the Beatles and have been listening to their music since before I was allowed to touch my parents' stereo. Many of their song lyrics can serve us as words to live by: "I get by with a little help from my friends." "Living is easy with eyes closed—misunderstanding all you see." "All you need is love." (Maybe not "Bang bang Maxwell's silver hammer came down upon her head," but you get the idea.)

My favorite one for this time of year is "Let it be." And that's because all those bird-friendly plants in your yard and garden can keep on being a source of food long past their blooming prime. Flowers such as zinnias, coneflowers, salvias, poppies, and other summer garden staples retain tiny seeds in their flower heads that birds will find in the months following frost, or the end of the blooming season (if your area doesn't have frost). Even garden plants such as tomatoes, peas, squash, and corn will harbor insect life in their stems and under their brown, curly leaves.

While many gardeners follow the conventional wisdom and clear out the old and dead plant material in early fall, I've always preferred a more laissez-faire approach. I leave the plants over winter for the birds to forage among. Then I clear things off the next spring, once the food value is depleted and we're planning the spring garden. It's a win-win—less work for me, more food for the birds. Of course, my neighbors, (if I had any nearby) might call me "the fool on the hill." But my birds hear me "whisper words of wisdom: Let it be."



About Bill Thompson, III

Bill Thompson, III, was the team captain for Watching Backyard Birds from its inception 23 years ago through his death on March 25, 2019. So much of what he wrote is timeless and remains informative, helpful, and inspiring.

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    by Liza Fox, Sun, 15 Nov 2020
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    by Nosferatu, Thu, 05 Nov 2020
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    by Ella Spencer Connolly, Thu, 27 Aug 2020
  • I found where he lives, then I keep him up all day by singing at full volume! Hah, that'll show the little sucker!
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    by JustMyOpinion, Sun, 26 Jul 2020