May 21, 2015 | Featured Web Article

Weird Nests

Baltmore orioles construct hanging, bag-shaped nests from plant fibers, string, and other materials.
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Here are some examples of unusual nest construction and unusual materials used by birds in their nests.

Great crested flycatchers, which are cavity nesters, often place shed snake skins trailing out of the nest hole. Scientists theorize that this may ward off potential avian predators or nest hole competitors. Great crested flycatchers may use cellophane if snake skins are scarce.

Rock pigeon: One nest near a metal factory was composed entirely of metal shavings. Another pigeon nest was found to be made of multicolored electrical wire.

Chimney swifts use their own saliva to bind their stick nests to the inside walls of chimneys.

Baltimore orioles make a baglike nest suspended from a branch, often over water.

Belted kingfishers excavate a hole in a riverbank or muddy hillside.

Can you add to the list? Join the conversation in the comments below!



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