Species Profile: Red-breasted Nuthatch
Oct 31, 2014

Species Profile: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Creeping along pine branches like a tiny mechanical toy, the red-breasted nuthatch is looking for seeds and for insects, spiders, and other edible morsels. Its small size and preference for northern coniferous forests may make it a less familiar sight to many backyard bird watchers.
Grabbing Grackles: A Short Story by Al Batt
Oct 24, 2014

Grabbing Grackles: A Short Story by Al Batt

My friend had grackles that nest in his yard. He informed me that he had been watching as two of the birds, which he refers to as blackbirds, built nests in adjacent trees. He related to me that he had been watching one bird steal material from the other's nest.
Is There a Screech-Owl In Your Neighborhood?
Oct 17, 2014

Is There a Screech-Owl In Your Neighborhood?

Can you identify the owl above? Eastern and western screech-owls are nearly identical. Until 1983, they were thought to be the same species. DNA tests showed they are not.
Don't Throw Away Your Pumpkin Seeds!
Oct 2, 2014

Don't Throw Away Your Pumpkin Seeds!

As you scrape out pumpkin guts for a pie or jack-o'-lantern, don't throw away the seeds! Don't even compost them! Squash seeds of any sort, including pumpkins, are a high protein treat for birds.
8 Common Bird-feeding Myths Debunked
Sep 25, 2014

8 Common Bird-feeding Myths Debunked

Have you ever noticed how much of what we consider "conventional wisdom" is actually wrong and ridiculous? Bird-feeding conventional wisdom is riddled with bad information. But you, my friend, are in luck! I have tried most everything in bird feeding at least once, and I have made nearly every mistake possible. Why? So you won't have to!
Leftover Cereal is For the Birds!
Sep 18, 2014

Leftover Cereal is For the Birds!

Made too much oatmeal? Don't throw it away! Just about any hot cereal—leftover—can be a hearty breakfast for the birds in your yard as long as you haven't added milk yet!
Carolina Wrens Make Charming Neighbors
Sep 11, 2014

Carolina Wrens Make Charming Neighbors

Creeping and exploring around door stoops, garages, house eaves, and tool sheds, Carolina wrens adopt a mi casa es su casa policy when it comes to nesting. If you find a nest cleverly hidden on a cluttered shelf or in a hanging flower basket, it's likely that of a Carolina wren. Their persistent songs, often given as a duet between members of a mated pair, brighten winter days and ring through the thick underbrush that they prefer.
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